The Seven Best Bakeries in the Bronx

Addeo & Sons

A visit to one of these seven Bronx bakeries is a stroll down memory lane, back to a time when baked goods were full-sized and calorie-rich. You won’t find skimpy miniature cupcakes decorated with edible flowers in this borough. Proudly unfashionable classics of the Jewish and Italian kitchens can be yours for a fraction of Manhattan prices. Mouth-watering sweets such as shiny black and white cookies, chocolate-chip infused ruggelach, dazzling rainbow cookies, authentic old-world bread and creamy cheesecake will put your gustatory senses into overload. These nostalgic bakeries are all accessible without a car so there are no excuses to come between you and this little slice of heaven.

Here are the seven best bakeries in the Bronx.

What: Mother’s Bake Shop
: 548 West 235th Street
: Chocolate babka, ruggelach and Russian coffee cake are some of the many delights at this Riverdale Kosher bakery, that has been serving better-than-Bubbe-makes Jewish-style baked goods since 1954. The highest praise is reserved for the black and white cookies, those giant cake like treats that have helped generations of New Yorkers avoid one of childhood’s great dilemmas, chocolate or vanilla? With a black and white, you get both. Everything is made on-premise, so prepare to be wowed by the sweet smells that waft out onto the sidewalk. It closes before sundown on Fridays, and remains closed until Sunday morning.
How to get there:
Take the #1 train to 238th Street

What: S & S Cheesecake
: 222 West 238th Street
: One bite of this creamy delight and you will know why Zagat sings its praises. It is dense yet surprisingly light, perfectly nailing that hard to attain sweet spot. The premises are a tad Spartan, which may account for why much of the business is mail order. For purists, go for the topping-free classic New York-style. In cheesecake speak, New York-style is code word for Jewish-style and is made with cream cheese, as opposed to ricotta cheese, which steals the show in an Italian-style cheesecake.  For a retro-look try one covered with glossy cherries.  Only whole cakes are sold, in two sizes, 2 or 5lbs.  Store hours are Monday-Friday, 6 a.m. until 3 p.m.
How to get there
: Take the # 1 train to 238th Street

What: Sal & Dom’s
: 1108 Allerton Ave.
: Owned and operated by the same family for four generations, this is the place to come for seasonal treats that you thought you couldn’t get outside of Italy, like stuffed Sicilian Easter breads and Christmas panettone. Handmade marzipan is used to lavishly decorate the tiered cakes that look like they came straight off the set of The Sopranos. Open daily.
How to get there: Take the #2 or 5 subway to White Plains Road. Walk a few blocks east on Allerton Avenue.

The following four bakeries are in the heart of Belmont, the Bronx’s Little Italy. They are accessible via Bronx-bound B and D trains to the Fordham Road/Grand Concourse station. The #4 subway will take you to the Fordham Road/ Jerome Ave. station. It is about a 15-minute walk to Arthur Avenue. You can also take Metro North and get off at Fordham Road.

6892888194_7f908e170a_zWhat: Madonia Brothers Bakery
: 2348 Arthur Ave.
: You can find sprinkle-dappled cookies, crunchy biscotti and classic cannoli here, but at Madonia Brothers you may start to believe that man actually can live on bread alone. The addictive olive bread may be the most popular item, but the distinctive raisin-studded fennel bread gets many votes for perfectly balancing sweet and savory. For something truly substantial, the ham-heavy prosciutto bread has a peppery kick that will fill and wake you up. The soft-crumbed cheese and jalepeño round is a spicy nod to this neighborhood’s growing Mexican population. The intoxicating smells assure you that all baking is done on premise. Open daily.

What: Addeo & Sons Italian Bakery
: 2372 Hughes Ave., 2nd location on Arthur Ave.
: Basic bread is king here, so don’t be put off by the slightly austere atmosphere. The signature variety is the pane di casa.  It is a hearty, uncomplicated loaf that is the essence of the old country. Fresh pizza dough should please the most die-hard traditionalists. The crispy taralli, seasoned with fennel or pepper, are crown-shaped bites that look like savory donuts, but have the crunchy texture of a cracker. Cookies, biscotti and breadcrumbs are as authentic as those you find in Italy. Closed Sundays.

What: De Lillo Pasticceria
: 610, E. 187 St.
: This venerable Belmont café recent move to spacious new digs makes it the most aesthetically pleasing pastry shop in the neighborhood. Patrons, including lots of Fordham University students and faculty, have ample room to sit, relax, and watch Italian television shows being broadcast. The coffee is excellent, and the waiter takes pride in making sure that your double caffé macchiato is exactly how you like it. Order a chocolate éclair to go with it and you will be presented with a velvety cream-filled oval, draped in a shiny chocolate glaze that will fill you up for most of the day. Real deal Italian pastries are lovingly displayed in the glass case. Excellent gelato, cakey rainbow cookies and festive cakes seal the deal. Open daily.

What: Artuso Pastry Shop
: 670 E.187 Street
Why: Family-run for four generations, Artuso’s tantalizing cannoli, mocha-laced tiramisu, and nutty pinoli cookies have kept the crowds happy for years, so there is no need to tinker with perfection. Made-to-order special occasion cakes are affordable, but it will look like you splurged. If you can’t make the trip, order their mini cannoli kit. It comes with everything you need to make a dozen cannoli at home in minutes, and makes a novel hostess gift. Open daily.

Photo: ChrisGoldNY

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